Autosupport Mechanisms in the Foot

Wikis > Biomechanics > Clinical Biomechanics > Concepts > Autosupport Mechanisms in the Foot

Proposed by Dananberg
Autosupport Mechanisms in the Foot:
The foot is assumed to have three autosupport mechanisms that foot needs to get established prior to the power input from above during propulsion:
1) Windlass mechanism: • best understood as a winch with the hallux as a handle • dorsiflexion of the first MPJ pulls on the plantar aponeurosis, shortening the distance between the first metatarsal head and calcaneus • this supinates the foot and is co-ordinated with the external rotation from above • this mechanism requires first MPJ dorsiflexion in the sagittal plane
2) Close packing of calcaneocuboid: • a close packing of the calcaneocuboid joint occurs secondary to a timely tightening of the plantar aponeurosis • this compresses the joint just prior to heel off (is this the midtarsal joint locking of the traditional approach?) • this requires ‘weight flow’ to be directed in a timely manner at the first interspace vis transfer of weight from the oblique axis to the transverse axis of the metatarsal heads • this mechanism requires first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion in the sagittal plane
3) Locked wedge effect: • compressive loading of the wedge shaped osseous structures in the tarsus by gravity • this mechanism require first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion in the sagittal plane All of these so-called autosupports require first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion in the sagittal plane and a timely transfer of weight from the oblique to the transverse axis of the metatarsal heads. This is dependent of the first ray plantarflexion

Related Topics:
Arches | Windlass Mechanism | Overpronation and Muscle Strength | Autosupport Mechanisms in the Foot | Overpronation and Muscle Strength | Foot strengthening exercises | Foot Core

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