Cuboid Syndrome

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Poorly recognised.
Cuboid assumed to become partially subluxed due to excessive traction from peroneus longus as the foot is excessively pronated  cuboid not stable as peroneus longus contracts  lateral aspect of cuboid pulled dorsally and medial aspect plantarly.
Cuboid may also become subluxed as part of lateral ankle sprain.

In about 4% of all foot injuries in athletes.

Clinical features:
Lateral pain on weightbearing – over calcaneocuboid joint and cuboid-metatarsal joints; pain is often referred  get a generalised foot discomfort, especially over lateral aspect of foot.
Pressing cuboid upwards  can produce pain
Range of movement of cuboid is restricted relative to unaffected foot.
If severe  may have shallow depression on dorsum of foot
Has not been documented on x-ray.

Differential diagnosis – sinus tarsi syndrome; stress fracture; peroneal tendonitis; irritation of os peroneum; ankle meniscoid lesion/impingement.
Pain in calcaneocuboid joint has been reported as being common following plantar fascia surgical release.

Treatment:
Activity modification.
Manipulation – cuboid pushed upward and laterally from the plantar surface
Ice, strapping, foot orthoses with cuboid notch, footwear with good rearfoot control

https://www.facebook.com/groups/597407630281957/permalink/887722197917164/
https://www.footmobilisation.com/blog/lateral-foot-pains-explained

LET'S TALK "CUBOID SYNDROME"...

I see an awful lot of dorsolateral foot pain which has been labelled under the umbrella of "cuboid syndrome". A short literature review shows that despite heavy reference to it historically it does not have any definitive diagnostic criteria. So what is it? Is it even a thing? As usual I don't have all the answers, but some thoughts are here in this brief video:

Posted by Sports Podiatry Info Ltd on Monday, July 17, 2017

 
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