Acne vulgaris

Acne vulgaris

The most common skin condition – principally in sites with densely populated sebaceous glands – face, back and chest primarily in older children and adolescents. Not a serious problem, but should not be dismissed as minor due to potential psychological effects and long tem scarring.

Results from an obstruction of the pilosebaceous unit, enlargement of the sebaceous gland, increased sebum production and the resultant inflammatory changes from the accumulation of the sebum. Most common during adolescence (affects up to 85%) – but can occur at any age in those taking androgens and corticosteroids.

Clinical features:
Appears as inflamed and non-inflamed papules, pustules, nodules, scars and cysts.

Treatment:
Most resolves spontaneously, but may leave residual scarring.
If mild  retinoic acid, benzyl peroxide, topical antibiotics
If moderate  add tetracycline to above
If severe  systemic antibiotics, isotretinoin

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